Participants shared not only their ideas for improving our communities, but also their commitments to taking action on those ideas.

The thinking and doing around tough topics, difficult issues, raising new ideas and brainstorming solutions to action is bringing new perspective to our work in philanthropy.

Issues of Concern

According to survey results, respondents who reported raising an issue of concern in their conversation did so primarily around:

EQUITY and SOCIAL INCLUSION
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EDUCATION and YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
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ECONOMIC ISSUES and POVERTY
0
PHILANTHROPY
0
HEALTH
0

Important Problems

According to survey results, respondents identified the following as the most important problems facing their communities:

ECONOMIC ISSUES and POVERTY
0
EQUITY and SOCIAL INCLUSION
0
EDUCATION and YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
0
THE JUDICIAL SYSTEM and PUBLIC SAFETY
0

IPCE also sought to identify to which causes respondents primarily contribute their time, treasure, and talent on a regular basis.

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of respondents reported giving in some capacity to education and youth development efforts, which corresponds to its citation by respondents as a high priority community problem.

Giving Time, Talent, and Treasure

0
EQUITY and SOCIAL INCLUSION
0
HEALTH
0
PHILANTHROPIC EFFORTS
0
ECONOMIC ISSUES and POVERTY
0
ARTS and CULTURE

Transportation, the judicial system and public safety, economic issues and poverty, and government are the categories where respondents are most likely to mention them as a problem, but not a cause.

On the Table 2015 featured thousands of conversations on social media.

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total #onthetable2015 mentions
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digital impressions generated

#1 trending topic

on Twitter in Chicago and Top 10 Nationally on May 12

Topics frequently mentioned with the #onthetable2015 campaign were #chicago, #disabilitymatters, #philanthropy, #trust100 and #ottyouthvoices.

In partnership with Mikva Challenge and the Chicago Public Schools Office of Service Learning, The Chicago Community Trust developed a youth conversation guide to support engagement in the classroom and at various youth events held across the region. It was used in numerous classrooms in the Chicago Public Schools and in suburban school districts, as well as shared with numerous organizations serving youth including Leadership Greater Chicago and Get In Chicago.

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from across the region participated in On the Table 2015.

Economic issues and poverty as well as the judicial system and public safety were themes most often mentioned as a top problem facing communities but not as an issue respondents discussed during conversations or a cause to which respondents contribute.

I was most struck by comments from some of the younger participants who stated that viewing the sketches of [the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial in Marquette Park] and images of the historical events, made them proud of the history of the community activism coupled with legacy of how the neighborhood has changed over time.